Peintre

Louis-Eugène Boudin

Louis-Eugène Boudin was born in Honfleur (Calvados) on 12 July 1824.

 

He was one of the greatest artists of the nineteenth century; a ship's boy in his youth, he let his artistic nature take over when he opened his own stationers-cum-framers. This daring nature became even more decisive in his career when he met Isabey and Troyon, who came to exhibit in the shop and encouraged him to paint. Although his art received a mixed reception, Boudin was nevertheless recognised by his peers. When he staged his first exhibition at the Salon in Paris in 1859, he met Baudelaire, Courbet and Monet, making him realise just how hard the work of an artist was. A precursor of Impressionism, a true lover of the natural movements of the sky and sea, Boudin was nicknamed the King of the skies, by Corot, who admired his art.

 

 

Louis-Eugène Boudin died in Deauville (Calvados) on 8 August 1898, facing his beloved sea.