Albrecht Dürer

Albrecht Dürer (1471-1528) was a painter, printmaker, and theorist of the German Renaissance. Born in Nuremberg, Dürer established his reputation and influence across from an early age with his high-quality woodcut prints. He knew the major Italian artists of his time, including Raphael, Giovanni Bellini and Leonardo da Vinci, and from 1512 Emperor Maximilian I became his patron.

Dürer's vast body of work includes engravings, altarpieces, portraits and self-portraits, watercolours and books. His watercolours also mark him as one of the first European landscape artists, while his ambitious woodcuts, while considered more gothic in style than the rest of his work, revolutionized the potential of that medium.


Dürer's introduction of classical motifs into Northern art, through his knowledge of Italian artists and German humanists, secured his reputation as one of the most important figures of the Northern Renaissance. This is reinforced by his theoretical treatises, which involve principles of mathematics, perspective, and ideal proportions.